Friday, 18 August 2017

Benedictine Matins readings for August 19-31

The table below provides links to posts containing the readings for the Benedictine Office at Matins for the rest of August.

Note that sources for the translations of the responsories, and for the chants for them can be found at the Benedictine Responsory Blog by chosing the label either for the relevant month, Sunday or feast, or the incipit.


Date
Benedictine Office readings (with liks to posts containing the texts)
Roman Office Scriptural readings are from...
Comments




Saturday 19 August
 Eccles 7

Sunday 20
 as for Benedictine

Monday 21
na -  St Bernard Ptolomaei, memorial
 Wisdom 3

Tuesday 22
 na - St Timothy, memorial
[Wisdom 6]
(Immaculate Heart of Mary)

Wednesday 23
na -  feria 
 Wisdom 7

Thursday 24
 as for Benedictine
Common of Apostles for Nocturns I readings and all responsories
Friday 25
 na - feria
 Wisdom 9

Saturday 26
 Wisdom 13

Sunday 27
 as for Benedictine

Monday 28
 (Ecclesaisticus/Sirach 1:22-)

Tuesday 29
 Sirach 2

Wednesday 30
 na - SS Felicis and Adauci, memorial
 Sirach 3

Thursday 31
 na - feria
 Sirach 3:22


Beheading of St John the Baptist (Class III, August 29)

Reading: From the Treatise concerning Virgins, by St. Ambrose the Bishop - We must not hurry past the record of blessed Baptist John. We must ask what he was; by whom he was slain; and why and how. He was a righteous man, murdered for his righteousness by adulterers. He was a judge, who suffered condemnation to death by the guilty ones because he had justly judged their guilt. He was the prophet whose death was a fee paid to a dancing-girl for a lascivious dance. And lastly a thing from which even savages would shrink his head was served up as a dish at a banquet. For the order to commit the atrocity was given amid the merriment of a dinner-party; and the servants of the murderer introduced the murder amid the courses of the meal, running from banquet to prison, and from prison to banquet! See how many infamies are contained in this one crime.

R. Misit Heródes rex manus, ac ténuit Ioánnem et vinxit eum in cárcere, quia metuébat eum propter Herodíadem, * Quam túlerat fratri suo Philíppo uxórem.
V. Arguébat Heródem Ioánnes propter Herodíadem.
R. Quam túlerat fratri suo Philíppo uxórem.
R. Herod the King sent forth, and laid hold upon John, and bound him in prison, for he feared him, for Herodias' sake, * His brother Philip's wife, for he had married her.
V. For John had rebuked Herod, for Herodias' sake.
R. His brother Philip's wife, for he had married her.

Feast of St Augustine of Hippo (Class III, August 28)

The reading and responsory for the feast are set out below:

Reading: Augustine was born of good parents at Tagaste in Africa, and in a short time surpassed all his companions in learning. As a young man, when in Carthage, he fell into the Manichean heresy. Later he went to Rome and was sent from there to Milan to teach rhetoric. At Milan, he was persuaded by Monica, his most devout mother, to become a frequent listener to the Bishop Ambrose. Ambrose brought it about that Augustine was fired with a desire for the Catholic faith, and baptized him when he was thirty-three years old. Going back to Africa, Augustine led a life governed by religion and holiness, and was made priest by Valerius, Bishop of Hippo, renowned for his sanctity. At this same period, he founded a religious community with whom he lived, taking part in their life and worship while he trained them very carefully to the apostolic life and to learning. Moved by his devotion, Valerius made him his coadjutor bishop. He wrote many works remarkable for their devotion, subtlety and diffuseness, to combat heresies and throw light on Christian teaching. When the Vandals were laying Africa waste and Hippo had been besieged for three months, he was taken with a fever and went to the Lord in the seventy-sixth year of his age. His body was buried first in Sardinia and then in Pavia, where it is venerated with honour.

R. In medio Ecclesiae aperuit os ejus * Et implevit eum Dominus spiritu sapientiae et intellectus.
V. Jucunditatem et exsultationem thesaurizavit super eum.
R. Et implevit eum Dominus spiritu sapientiae et intellectus.
V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, * et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Et implevit eum Dominus spiritu sapientiae et intellectus.
R. In the midst of the congregation did the Lord open his mouth. * And filled him with the spirit of wisdom and understanding.
V. He made him rich with joy and gladness.
R. And filled him with the spirit of wisdom and understanding.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. And filled him with the spirit of wisdom and understanding.

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost/Fourth Sunday of August

The responsories for the Benedictine Office for the twelfth Sunday after Pentecost this year are those for August; Nocturn I&II readings are of the fourth Sunday of August.

Nocturn I 

Reading 1: The beginnng of the book of Ecclesiasticus - All wisdom is from the Lord God, and hath been always with him, and is before all time. Who hath numbered the sand of the sea, and the drops of rain, and the days of the world? Who hath measured the height of heaven, and the breadth of the earth, and the depth of the abyss? Who hath searched out the wisdom of God that goeth before all things?

R. In principio Deus antequam terram faceret, priusquam abyssos constitueret, priusquam produceret fontes aquarum.* Antequam montes collocarentur, ante omnes colles generavit me Dominus.
V. Quando praeparabat caelos, aderam, cum eo cuncta componens.
R. Antequam montes collocarentur, ante omnes colles generavit me Dominus.
R. God possessed me in the beginning, before He made the earth, before He created the depths, before He caused the fountains of water to spring. * Before the mountains were settled, before there were any hills, did the Lord beget me.
V. When He prepared the heavens, I was there with Him, ordering all things.
R. Before the mountains were settled, before there were any hills, did the Lord beget me.

Reading 2: Wisdom hath been created before all things, and the understanding of prudence from everlasting. The word of God on high is the fountain of wisdom, and her ways are everlasting commandments.To whom hath the root of wisdom been revealed, and who hath known her wise counsels? To whom hath the discipline of wisdom been revealed and made manifest? and who hath understood the multiplicity of her steps?

R. Gyrum caeli circuivi sola, et in fluctibus maris ambulavi, in omni gente et in omni populo primatum tenui: * Superborum et sublimium colla propria virtute calcavi.
V. Ego in altissimis habito, et thronus meus in columna nubis.
R. Superborum et sublimium colla propria virtute calcavi.
R. I alone compassed the circuit of heaven, and walked on the waves of the sea. In every nation and in every people, I held the first place.
* In the greatness of my strength have I trodden under my feet the necks of such as be haughty and proud.
V. I dwell in the highest places, and my throne is in a cloudy pillar.
R. In the greatness of my strength have I trodden under my feet the necks of such as be haughty and proud.

Reading 3: There is one most high Creator Almighty, and a powerful king, and greatly to be feared, who sitteth upon his throne, and is the God of dominion. He created her in the Holy Ghost, and saw her, and numbered her, and measured her. And he poured her out upon all his works, and upon all flesh according to his gift, and hath given her to them that love him.

R. Emitte Domine sapientiam de sede magnitudinis tuae, ut mecum sit, et mecum laboret: * Ut sciam quid acceptum sit coram te omni tempore.
V. Da mihi Domine sedium tuarum assistricem sapientiam.
R. Ut sciam quid acceptum sit coram te omni tempore.
R. O send out wisdom from the throne of thy glory, O Lord, to be with me, and to labour with me,* That I may know at all times what is pleasing unto thee.
V. Give me wisdom, O Lord, that sitteth by thy throne.
R. That I may know at all times what is pleasing unto thee.

Reading 4: The fear of the Lord is honour, and glory, and gladness, and a crown of joy. The fear of the Lord shall delight the heart, and shall give joy, and gladness, and length of days. With him that feareth the Lord, it shall go well in the latter end, and in the day of his death he shall be blessed. The love of God is honourable wisdom. And they to whom she shall show herself love her by the sight, and by the knowledge of her great works. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and was created with the faithful in the womb, it walketh with chosen women, and is known with the just and faithful.

R. Ne derelínquas me, Dómine, Pater et dominator vitæ meæ, ut non corruam in conspéctu adversariórum meórum: * Ne gaudeat de me inimícus meus.
V. Apprehénde arma et scutum et exsúrge in adjutórium mihi.
R. Ne gaudeat de me inimícus meus.
V: Gloria Patri...
R. Ne gaudeat de me inimícus meus.
R. O Lord, Father and Governor of my life, leave me not, lest I fall before mine adversaries,
* and mine enemy rejoice over me.
V. Take hold of shield and buckler, and stand up for mine help.
R. Lest mine enemy rejoice over me.
V: Glory be...
R. Lest mine enemy rejoice over me.

Nocturn II

Reading 5: From the Book of Moral Reflections on Job, written by Pope St Gregory the Great - Come there are who are careless concerning their true life, greedy of the things which pass away, but as to the things which are eternal, either understand them not, or, understanding them, holding them to be but of little moment they feel no sorrow, nor know how to take wise advice and, in forgetfulness of the heavenly possessions which they have lost, they deem themselves alas, poor wretches happy in their goods. They lift not up their eyes to the light of truth for which they were created no keen desire ever maketh them to cast a longing look toward the everlasting Fatherland. Leaving alone the chief end for which they were made, they fix their affections upon the exile which they are enduring, instead of upon their home, and make merry in the blindness which they are suffering, as though it were glorious day-light.

R. Da mihi, Dómine, sedium tuárum assistrícem sapiéntiam, et noli me reprobare a púeris tuis:
* Quóniam servus tuus sum ego, et fílius ancíllæ tuæ.
V. Mitte illam de sede magnitúdinis tuæ, ut mecum sit et mecum labóret.
R. Quóniam servus tuus sum ego, et fílius ancíllæ tuæ.
R. Give me wisdom, O Lord, that sitteth by thy throne, and reject me not from among thy children. * For I am thy servant and son of thine handmaid.
V. O send her out from the throne of thy glory, to be with me and to labour with me.
R. For I am thy servant and son of thine handmaid.

Reading 6: But, on the other hand, the understandings of the elect, while they apprehend the things which pass away, perceive them to be indeed nothings, and work towards grasping the true end to which they were created, and since nothing outside God satisfieth them, their thought, wearied by the intensity of speculation, findeth rest in the hope for, and the contemplation of, their Maker. They are fain to take their place among the citizens above, and each one of them, although still placed in the world as concerns his body, doth yet in heart and mind ascend above the world. They bemoan the hardships of the exile which they are enduring, and rouse themselves by the constant pricking of their love, to look to their Fatherland above

R. Initium sapiéntiæ timor Dómini: * Intelléctus bonus ómnibus faciéntibus eum: laudátio ejus manet in sæculum sæculi.
V. Diléctio illíus custódia legum est: quia omnis sapiéntia timor Dómini.
R. Intelléctus bonus ómnibus faciéntibus eum: laudátio ejus manet in sæculum sæculi.
R. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.* A good understanding have all they that do His commandments. His praise endureth for ever.
V. Love is the keeping of her laws, for all wisdom is the fear of the Lord.
R. A good understanding have all they that do His commandments. His praise endureth for ever.

Reading 7: When therefore such an one seeth with grief that by sin he hath lost an eternal inheritance, he findeth this healthy counsel, to reckon but lightly the things of time through which he is passing, and as the riper groweth his wise course that he hath chosen, to let be these perishing things, the deeper groweth his sorrow that he hath not yet attained unto the things which endure.We must also realise that they who are headlong in their courses, feel not sorrow of heart. They that live without thought, who leave themselves recklessly to the guidance of events, escape the weariness of thought.

R. Verbum iníquum et dolosum longe fac a me, Dómine: * Dívítias et paupertátem ne déderis mihi, sed tantum victui meo tríbue necessaria.
V. Duo rogávi te, ne déneges mihi ántequam moriar.
R. Dívítias et paupertátem ne déderis mihi, sed tantum victui meo tríbue necessaria.
R. Lord, remove far from me vanity and lies.* Give me neither poverty nor riches, but feed me with food convenient for me.
V. Two things have I required of thee deny me them not before I die.
R. Give me neither poverty nor riches, but feed me with food convenient for me.

Reading 8: He that ordereth his life by prudent consideration, looketh carefully around him before each thing that he doth, and, like a man, that before advancing on an uncertain way, trieth the ground with his foot, so he taketh thought beforehand, lest some sudden and evil thing should happen to him he considereth whether that which he hath a mind to do is not forbidden to him by caution, whether he be not too hasty about things which were better put off to another season, lest evil should overcome him by open attack upon his lusts, or even good undo him by the in-bringing of vain glory.

R. Magna enim sunt iudícia tua, Dómine, et inenarrabília verba tua: * Magnificásti pópulum tuum et honorásti.
V. Transtulísti illos per Mare Rubrum et transvexísti eos per aquam nimiam.
R. Magnificásti pópulum tuum et honorasti.
V: Gloria...
R. Magnificásti pópulum tuum et honorasti.
R. Great are thy judgments, O Lord, and thy words cannot be expressed.* Thou didst make thy people mighty and honourable.
V. Thou broughtest them through the Red Sea, and leddest them through much water.
R. Thou didst make thy people mighty and honourable.
V: Glory be
R. Thou didst make thy people mighty and honourable.

Nocturn III 

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Luke - At that time Jesus said unto His disciples Blessed are the eyes which see the things that ye see. For I tell you that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them. And so on.

Homily by the Venerable Bede, Priest at Jarrow - Blessed were the eyes not of Scribes and Pharisees, which saw but the Body of the Lord, but those eyes, eyes blessed indeed, which were able to see those things whereof it is written "Thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes." Blessed are the eyes of those little ones unto whom it seemeth good in the eyes of the Son to reveal Himself and the Father also. Abraham rejoiced to see the day of Christ and he saw it, and was glad.

R. Domine pater et Deus vitae meae, ne derelinquas me in cogitatu maligno: extollentiam oculorum meorum ne dederis mihi, et desiderium malignum averte a me Domine; aufer a me concupiscentiam, * Et animo irreverenti et infrunito ne tradas me Domine.
V. Ne derelinquas me Domine, ne accrescant ignorantiae meae, nec multiplicentur delicta mea.
R. Et animo irreverenti et infrunito ne tradas me Domine.
R. O Lord, Father and God of my life, leave me not to evil counsels; give me not a proud look, but turn away from me an haughty mind, O Lord Turn away from me concupiscence, * And give me not over unto an impudent and froward mind, O Lord!
V. Leave me not, O Lord, lest mine ignorance increase, and my sins abound.
R. And give me not over unto an impudent and froward mind, O Lord.

Reading 10: Isaiah, and Micah, and many among the Prophets, saw the glory of the Lord, wherefore also they be called Seers, but all they beheld it and hailed it afar off, seeing but as through a glass, darkly.Otherwise were the Apostles, who saw the Lord face to Face, eating with Him, and learning from Him by asking whatsoever they listed. For them there was no need to be taught by Angels, or the shifting fabric of visions.

R. Quæ sunt in corde hóminum, óculi tui vident, Dómine, et in libro tuo ómnia scribéntur: * Homo videt in facie, Deus autem in corde.
V. Omnia enim corda scrutátur, et univérsas méntium cogitatiónes intélligit.
R. Homo videt in facie, Deus autem in corde.
R. Lord, thine eyes behold all that is in the heart of man, and in thy book are they all written. * Man looketh on the outward appearance, but God looketh on the heart.
V. For He searcheth all hearts, and understandeth all the imaginations of the thoughts.
R. Man looketh on the outward appearance, but God looketh on the heart.

Reading 11: They whom Luke doth call Prophets and kings, Matthew nameth as "Prophets and righteous men". Righteous men are indeed mighty kings, who know how to lord it over their own rebellious temptations, instead of falling under them to become their slaves."And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted Him, saying Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?"

R. Præbe, fili cor mihi, et óculi tui vias meas custódiant: * Ut addátur grátia cápiti tuo.
V. Attende, fili mi, sapiéntiam meam et ad elóquium meum inclína aurem tuam.
R. Ut addátur grátia cápiti tuo.
R. My son, give me thine heart, and let thine eyes observe my ways. * For they shall be an ornament of grace unto thine head.
V. My son, attend unto my wisdom, and incline thine ear unto my sayings.
R. For they shall be an ornament of grace unto thine head.

Reading 12: This lawyer, who stood up to ask the Lord a tempting question touching eternal life, took the subject of his asking, as I think, from the words which the Lord had just uttered, when He said "Rejoice, because your names are written in heaven". But his attempt was a proof of the truth of that which the Lord immediately added "I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that Thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes!"

R. Duo Seraphim clamabant alter ad alterum:
* Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth: * Plena est omnis terra gloria ejus.
V. Tres sunt qui testimonium dant in caelo, Pater, Verbum, et Spiritus Sanctus: et hi tres unum sunt.
R. Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth:
V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, * et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Plena est omnis terra gloria ejus.
R. One Seraph cried unto another * Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts * the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.

Gospel: St Luke 10:23-37

 And turning to his disciples, he said: Blessed are the eyes that see the things which you see. For I say to you, that many prophets and kings have desired to see the things that you see, and have not seen them; and to hear the things that you hear, and have not heard them. And behold a certain lawyer stood up, tempting him, and saying, Master, what must I do to possess eternal life? But he said to him: What is written in the law? how readest thou?  He answering, said: Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind: and thy neighbour as thyself. And he said to him: Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.  But he willing to justify himself, said to Jesus: And who is my neighbour? And Jesus answering, said: A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among robbers, who also stripped him, and having wounded him went away, leaving him half dead.And it chanced, that a certain priest went down the same way: and seeing him, passed by.  In like manner also a Levite, when he was near the place and saw him, passed by.  But a certain Samaritan being on his journey, came near him; and seeing him, was moved with compassion. And going up to him, bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine: and setting him upon his own beast, brought him to an inn, and took care of him.  And the next day he took out two pence, and gave to the host, and said: Take care of him; and whatsoever thou shalt spend over and above, I, at my return, will repay thee. Which of these three, in thy opinion, was neighbour to him that fell among the robbers?  But he said: He that shewed mercy to him. And Jesus said to him: Go, and do thou in like manner.

Saturday of Our Lady - Saturdays 4&5 of August

The one reading for the Office of Our Lady on Saturday in the Benedictine Office is set out below.

Reading: Sermon 4 of St Bernard, Abbot* - Ascending, therefore, from the desert, the Queen of the world, as the Church sings, was made beautiful even to the holy angels and sweet in her delights.  But  let them cease to wonder at the delights of the desert, for the Lord hath given goodness and our earth hath yielded its fruit.  Why do they wonder that Mary ascends from the desert of the earth abounding with delights; let them wonder rather at Christ, being poor, descending from the plenititude of the heavenly Kingdom, for it seems by far a greater miracle that the Son of God deigned to be made a little less than the angels than that the Mother of God should be exalted above the angels.  Indeed, His humiliation has been made our exaltation; his miseries are the delights of the world.  Finally, being rich, He was made poor on account of us, that He might enrich us by His poverty.

R. Felix namque es, sacra Virgo Maria, et omni laude dignissima: * Quia ex te ortus est sol justitiae, * Christus Deus noster.
V. Ora pro populo, interveni pro clero, intercede pro devoto femineo sexu: sentiant omnes tuum juvamen, quicumque celebrant tuam sanctam commemorationem.
R. Quia ex te ortus est sol justitiae.
V. Gloria Patri
R. Christus Deus noster.
R. O holy Virgin Mary, happy indeed art thou, and right worthy of all praise * For out of thee rose the Sun of righteousness, even Christ our God.
V. Pray for the people, plead for the clergy, make intercession for all women vowed to God. Let all that are making this holy memorial of thee feel the might of thine assistance.
R. For out of thee rose the Sun of righteousness
V. Glory be...
R. Even Christ our God.

*Translation source: Liturgical Readings The Lessons of the Temporal Cycle and the Principal Feasts of the Sanctoral Cycle According to the Monastic Breviary, Grail Publications, 1943, pg 482 (Seventh day of the Octave of the Assumption).

Feast of St Bartholomew (August 24), Class II

The readings and responsories arranged as for the Benedictine Office (1962) for the Feast of St Bartholomew are set out below.

The responsories and first Nocturn readings are from the Common of Apostles.  The translations of responsory nos 4, 8, 11, 12 are mine (adapted from the Douay-Rheims) and so are drafts for comment.  Sources for the translations and chants can be found on the Benedictine Responsory Blog.

Nocturn I 

Reading 1: Lesson from the first letter of St. Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians -  Let a man so account of us as of the ministers of Christ, and the dispensers of the mysteries of God.  Here now it is required among the dispensers, that a man be found faithful.  But to me it is a very small thing to be judged by you, or by man's day; but neither do I judge my own self.  For I am not conscious to myself of any thing, yet am I not hereby justified; but he that judgeth me, is the Lord.

R. Ecce ego mitto vos sicut oves in médio lupórum, dicit Dóminus: * Estóte ergo prudéntes sicut serpéntes, et símplices sicut colúmbæ.
V. Dum lucem habétis, crédite in lucem, ut fílii lucis sitis.
R. Estóte ergo prudéntes sicut serpéntes, et símplices sicut colúmbæ.
R. Behold, I send you as sheep in the midst of wolves, said the Lord: * Be ye, therefore, wise as serpents and simple as doves.
V. Whilst you have the light, believe in the light, that you may be the children of light.
R. Be ye therefore wise as serpents and simple as doves.

Reading 2: Therefore judge not before the time; until the Lord come, who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts; and then shall every man have praise from God.  But these things, brethren, I have in a figure transferred to myself and to Apollo, for your sakes; that in us you may learn, that one be not puffed up against the other for another, above that which is written. For who distinguisheth thee? Or what hast thou that thou hast not received? And if thou hast received, why dost thou glory, as if thou hadst not received it?

R. Tóllite iugum meum super vos, dicit Dóminus, et díscite a me, quia mitis sum et húmilis corde: * Iugum enim meum suáve est, et onus meum leve.
V. Et inveniétis réquiem animábus vestris.
R. Iugum enim meum suáve est, et onus meum leve.
R. Take up my yoke upon you, said the Lord, and learn of me, because I am meek, and humble of heart. * For my yoke is sweet and my burden light.
V. And you shall find rest to your souls.
R. For my yoke is sweet and my burden light.


Reading 3: You are now full; you are now become rich; you reign without us; and I would to God you did reign, that we also might reign with you. For I think that God hath set forth us apostles, the last, as it were men appointed to death: we are made a spectacle to the world, and to angels, and to men. We are fools for Christ's sake, but you are wise in Christ; we are weak, but you are strong; you are honourable, but we without honour.

R. Dum stetéritis ante reges et prǽsides, nolíte cogitáre quómodo aut quid loquámini:* Dábitur enim vobis in illa hora, quid loquámini.
V. Non enim vos estis qui loquímini: sed Spíritus Pátris vestri, qui lóquitur in vobis.
R. Dábitur enim vobis in illa hora, quid loquámini.
R. But when they shall deliver you up to the judges, take no thought how or what to speak:
* for it shall be given you in that hour what to speak:
V. For it is not you that speak, but the spirit of your Father that speaketh in you.
R. For it shall be given you in that hour what to speak.

Reading 4: Even unto this hour we both hunger and thirst, and are naked, and are buffeted, and have no fixed abode;  And we labour, working with our own hands: we are reviled, and we bless; we are persecuted, and we suffer it. We are blasphemed, and we entreat; we are made as the refuse of this world, the offscouring of all even until now. I write not these things to confound you; but I admonish you as my dearest children. For if you have ten thousand instructors in Christ, yet not many fathers. For in Christ Jesus, by the gospel, I have begotten you.

R: Fuerunt sine querela ante Dominum, et ab invicem non sunt separati; * Calicem Domini biberunt et amici Dei facti sunt.
V: Tradiderunt corpora sua ad supplicia;
ideo coronantur et accipiunt palmam
R: Calicem Domini biberunt et amici Dei facti sunt.
V: Gloria Patri..
R: Tradiderunt...
R: They were without blame before the Lord and were not divided from each other. * They drank from the Lord's chalice and were made friends of God.
V: They handed their bodies to chastisement for the sake of God and therefore they are crowned and accept the palm
R: They drank from the Lord's chalice and were made friends of God.
V: Glory be...
R: They drank from the Lord's chalice and were made friends of God.

Nocturn II

Reading 5: The Apostle Bartholomew was a Galilean. In the division of the world among the Apostles it fell to his lot to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ in hither India. He went thither and preached to those nations the coming of the Lord Jesus, according to the Gospel of St. Matthew.

R. Vidi coniúnctos viros, habéntes spléndidas vestes, et Ángelus Dómini locútus est ad me, dicens: * Isti sunt viri sancti facti amíci Dei.
V. Vidi Ángelum Dei fortem, volántem per médium cælum, voce magna clamántem et dicéntem.
R. Isti sunt viri sancti facti amíci Dei.
R. I saw men standing together, clad in shining raiment, and the Angel of the Lord spake unto me, saying * These men are holy, for they are the friends of God.
V. I saw a strong Angel of God fly into the midst of heaven, saying with a loud voice
R. These men are holy, for they are the friends of God.

Reading 6: When he had turned many in that province to Jesus Christ, and had endured many toils and woes, he came into the Greater Armenia.There he brought to the Christian faith Polymius the King, and his wife, and likewise the inhabitants of twelve cities.

R. Beáti estis, cum maledíxerint vobis hómines, et persecúti vos fúerint, et díxerint omne malum advérsum vos, mentiéntes, propter me: * Gaudéte et exsultáte, quóniam merces vestra copiósa est in cælis.
V. Cum vos óderint hómines, et cum separáverint vos, et exprobráverint, et eiécerint nomen vestrum tamquam malum propter Fílium hóminis.
R. Gaudéte et exsultáte, quóniam merces vestra copiósa est in cælis.
R. Blessed are ye when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for My sake;* Rejoice, and be exceeding glad, for great is your reward in heaven.
V. When men shall hate you, and when they shall separate you from their company, and shall reproach you, and cast out your name as evil, for the Son of Man's sake.
R. Rejoice, and be exceeding glad, for great is your reward in heaven.

Reading 7: This stirred up a great hatred against him among the priests of that nation. They so inflamed against the Apostle Astyages the brother of King Polymius, that he savagely ordered Bartholomew to be flayed alive and beheaded; under the which martyrdom he gave up his soul to God.

R. Isti sunt triumphatóres et amíci Dei, qui contemnéntes iussa príncipum, meruérunt præmia ætérna: * Modo coronántur, et accípiunt palmam.
V. Isti sunt qui venérunt ex magna tribulatióne, et lavérunt stolas suas in sánguine Agni.
R. Modo coronántur, et accípiunt palmam.

R. These are they which have conquered, and are become the friends of God, who recked not of the commandments of princes, and earned the everlasting reward. * And now have they crowns on their heads, and palms in their hands.
V. These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes in the blood of the Lamb.
R. And now have they crowns on their heads, and palms in their hands.

Reading 8: His body was buried at the town of Albanopolis in the Greater Armenia, where he had suffered. It was afterwards taken to the Island of Lipari, and thence carried to Benevento. Lastly, the Emperor Otho III. brought it to Rome, where it was laid in the Church dedicated to God in his name on the Island in the Tiber.

 R: Constitues eos principes super omnem terram memores erun nominis tui Domine memores erunt nominis tui * In omni progenie et generatione
V: Nimis honorificati sunt amici tui, Deus; nimis confortatus est principatus eorum.
R: In omni progenie et generatione
V: Gloria Patri...
R: In omni progenie et generatione
R: Thou shalt make them princes over all the earth.They shall remember thy name * Throughout all generations.
V: Thy friends, O God, are made exceedingly honourable: their principality is exceedingly strengthened.
R: Throughout all generations.
V: Glory be...
R: Throughout all generations.


Nocturn III 

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Luke - At that time Jesus went out into a mountain to pray, and continued all night in prayer to God. And when it was day, He called unto Him His disciples. And so on.

Homily by St. Ambrose, Bishop of Milan  - All they who go up into the mountain are the great and the aspiring. It is not to every man that the Prophet saith: O thou that tellest good tidings to Zion, get thee up into the high mountain, Thou that tellest good tidings to Jerusalem, lift up thy voice with strength. Not with bodily feet, but by high deeds get thee up into this mountain, and follow Christ, that thou mayest be a mountain thyself. Therefore it is that thou findest in the Gospel that none but His disciples went up into the mountain with the Lord.

R. Isti sunt qui vivéntes in carne, plantavérunt Ecclésiam sánguine suo: * Cálicem Dómini bibérunt, et amíci Dei facti sunt.
V. In omnem terram exívit sonus eórum, et in fines orbis terræ verba eórum.
R. Cálicem Dómini bibérunt, et amíci Dei facti sunt.
R. These are they who while yet they lived in the flesh, planted the Church in their own blood; * They drank of the Lord's cup, and became the friends of God.
V. Their sound is gone out through all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.
R. They drank of the Lord's cup, and became the friends of God.

Reading 10: The Lord therefore prayeth, not to entreat anything for Himself, but to obtain somewhat for me. For, albeit the Father had given the Son power over all flesh, that He might give eternal life to as many as He had given Him, the Son Himself, being found in fashion as a man, thinketh well to pray the Father on our behalf, inasmuch as He is our Advocate with the Father. And continued all night in prayer to God. Herein, O Christian, a pattern is set before thee, an example is given thee, after the which thou oughtest to aspire.

R. Isti sunt viri sancti, quos elégit Dóminus in caritáte non ficta, et dedit illis glóriam sempitérnam: * Quorum doctrína fulget Ecclésia, ut sole luna.
V. Sancti per fidem vicérunt regna: operáti sunt iustítiam.
R. Quorum doctrína fulget Ecclésia, ut sole luna.
R. These men are saints, whom the Lord hath chosen in love unfeigned, and hath given them glory everlasting. These are they * By the light of whose teaching the Church is glorified, even as the moon is glorified by the light of the sun.
V. The saints through faith subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness.
R. By the light of whose teaching the Church is glorified, even as the moon is glorified by the light of the sun.

Reading 11: What doth it not behove thee to do for thy salvation, when Christ spent an whole night in prayer for the same What doth it become thee to do, when thou willest some good work, when Christ prayed before He sent forth His Apostles He prayed first, and He prayed alone. Neither, unless I am mistaken, do we anywhere find that He ever joined in prayer with His disciples. He ever prayed alone. Human desires cannot grasp the counsel of God, nor can any man, however spiritually minded, share the thoughts of God.

R: Qui sunt isti qui ut nubes volant,* Et quasi columbae ad fenestras suas?
V: In omnem terram exivit sonus eorum, et in fines orbis terrae verba eorum.
R: Et quasi columbae ad fenestras suas?
R: Who are these, that fly as clouds, * And as doves to their windows?
V: Their sound hath gone forth into all the earth: and their words unto the ends of the world.
R: And as doves to their windows? 

Reading 12: The Evangelist continueth thus: And when it was day, He called unto Him His disciples and of them He chose twelve whom He sent forth to help the salvation of men by sowing the seed of the faith throughout the whole world. Consider here the counsel of heaven. He chose out for His mission men, not wise, nor rich, nor noble, but fishermen and publicans, lest He should seem to have converted any to His grace by skill, or bought them with money, or drawn them by the power and authority of greatness, and the simple force of the truth, not the charms of argument, might have the victory.

R. Non sunt loquelae neque sermones, quorum no audiantur voces eorum * In omnem terram exivit sonus eorum, et in fines orbis terrae verba eorum.
V. Nimis honorati sunt amici tui Deus, nimis confortatus est principatus eorum.
R. In omnem terram exivit sonus eorum, et in fines orbis terrae verba eorum.
V: Gloria Patri
R: In omnem terram exivit sonus eorum, et in fines orbis terrae verba eorum.
R. There are no speeches nor languages, where their voices are not heard.* Their sound hath gone forth into all the earth: and their words unto the ends of the world.
V. Your friends O Lord are made exceedingly honourable: their principality is exceedingly strengthened.
R. Their sound hath gone forth into all the earth: and their words unto the ends of the world.
V: Glory be...
R. Their sound hath gone forth into all the earth: and their words unto the ends of the world.

Gospel: St Luke 6:12-19

And it came to pass in those days, that he went out into a mountain to pray, and he passed the whole night in the prayer of God. And when day was come, he called unto him his disciples; and he chose twelve of them (whom also he named apostles): Simon, whom he surnamed Peter, and Andrew his brother, James and John, Philip and Bartholomew, Matthew and Thomas, James the son of Alpheus, and Simon who is called Zelotes, And Jude, the brother of James, and Judas Iscariot, who was the traitor. And coming down with them, he stood in a plain place, and the company of his disciples, and a very great multitude of people from all Judea and Jerusalem, and the sea coast both of Tyre and Sidon, Who were come to hear him, and to be healed of their diseases. And they that were troubled with unclean spirits, were cured. And all the multitude sought to touch him, for virtue went out from him, and healed all.

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Matins readings for the third Sunday of August/Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

The responsories at Matins in the Benedictine Office on August 20, 2017 are those set for August. Sources for the translations and chants for the responsories can be found on the Benedictine Responsory Blog.

The Nocturns I&II readings are for the third Sunday of August; Nocturn III are of the Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost.

Nocturn I

Reading 1: the beginning of the book of Wisdom - Love justice, you that are the judges of the earth. Think of the Lord in goodness, and seek him in simplicity of heart. For he is found by them that tempt him not: and he showeth himself to them that have faith in him. For perverse thoughts separate from God: and his power, when it is tried, reproveth the unwise:  For wisdom will not enter into a malicious soul, nor dwell in a body subject to sins.

R. In principio Deus antequam terram faceret, priusquam abyssos constitueret, priusquam produceret fontes aquarum.* Antequam montes collocarentur, ante omnes colles generavit me Dominus.
V. Quando praeparabat caelos, aderam, cum eo cuncta componens.
R. Antequam montes collocarentur, ante omnes colles generavit me Dominus.
R. God possessed me in the beginning, before He made the earth, before He created the depths, before He caused the fountains of water to spring. * Before the mountains were settled, before there were any hills, did the Lord beget me.
V. When He prepared the heavens, I was there with Him, ordering all things.
R. Before the mountains were settled, before there were any hills, did the Lord beget me.

Reading 2: For the Holy Spirit of discipline will flee from the deceitful, and will withdraw himself from thoughts that are without understanding, and he shall not abide when iniquity cometh in. For the spirit of wisdom is benevolent, and will not acquit the evil speaker from his lips: for God is witness of his reins, and he is a true searcher of his heart, and a hearer of his tongue.  For the spirit of the Lord hath filled the whole world: and that, which containeth all things, hath knowledge of the voice.

R. Gyrum caeli circuivi sola, et in fluctibus maris ambulavi, in omni gente et in omni populo primatum tenui: * Superborum et sublimium colla propria virtute calcavi.
V. Ego in altissimis habito, et thronus meus in columna nubis.
R. Superborum et sublimium colla propria virtute calcavi.
R. I alone compassed the circuit of heaven, and walked on the waves of the sea. In every nation and in every people, I held the first place.* In the greatness of my strength have I trodden under my feet the necks of such as be haughty and proud.
V. I dwell in the highest places, and my throne is in a cloudy pillar.
R. In the greatness of my strength have I trodden under my feet the necks of such as be haughty and proud.

Reading 3: Therefore he that speaketh unjust things cannot be hid, neither shall the chastising judgment pass him by. For inquisition shall be made into the thoughts of the ungodly: and the hearing of his words shall come to God, to the chastising of his iniquities. For the ear of jealousy heareth all things, and the tumult of murmuring shall not be hid.

R. Emitte Domine sapientiam de sede magnitudinis tuae, ut mecum sit, et mecum laboret: * Ut sciam quid acceptum sit coram te omni tempore.
V. Da mihi Domine sedium tuarum assistricem sapientiam.
R. Ut sciam quid acceptum sit coram te omni tempore.
R. O send out wisdom from the throne of thy glory, O Lord, to be with me, and to labour with me,* That I may know at all times what is pleasing unto thee.
V. Give me wisdom, O Lord, that sitteth by thy throne.
R. That I may know at all times what is pleasing unto thee.

Reading 4: Keep yourselves therefore from murmuring, which profiteth nothing, and refrain your tongue from detraction, for an obscure speech shall not go for nought: and the mouth that belieth, killeth the soul.  Seek not death in the error of your life, neither procure ye destruction by the works of your hands.  For God made not death, neither hath he pleasure in the destruction of the living.

R. Ne derelínquas me, Dómine, Pater et dominator vitæ meæ, ut non corruam in conspéctu adversariórum meórum: * Ne gaudeat de me inimícus meus.
V. Apprehénde arma et scutum et exsúrge in adjutórium mihi.
R. Ne gaudeat de me inimícus meus.
V: Gloria Patri...
R. Ne gaudeat de me inimícus meus.
R. O Lord, Father and Governor of my life, leave me not, lest I fall before mine adversaries,
* and mine enemy rejoice over me.
V. Take hold of shield and buckler, and stand up for mine help.
R. Lest mine enemy rejoice over me.
V: Glory be...
R. Lest mine enemy rejoice over me.

Nocturn II 

Reading 5: From St Ambrose, On Offices - Great is the glory of justice. She liveth for others rather than for herself. By her our commonwealth and fellowship are holpen. She holdeth such a pre-eminence that all things are subject unto her judgment. She helpeth others. She giveth wealth. She refuseth not to labour. She taketh upon her the dangers of others. Who would not desire to hold this castle of power and courage, if the covetousness of our first parents had not weakened and distorted the strength of our nerve But so it is, that, while we are fain to increase wealth, to put by money, to add lands to our possessions, or to make show of our abundance, we put off the image of justice, and lose charity toward our brethren.

R. Da mihi, Dómine, sedium tuárum assistrícem sapiéntiam, et noli me reprobare a púeris tuis:
* Quóniam servus tuus sum ego, et fílius ancíllæ tuæ.
V. Mitte illam de sede magnitúdinis tuæ, ut mecum sit et mecum labóret.
R. Quóniam servus tuus sum ego, et fílius ancíllæ tuæ.
R. Give me wisdom, O Lord, that sitteth by thy throne, and reject me not from among thy children. * For I am thy servant and son of thine handmaid.
V. O send her out from the throne of thy glory, to be with me and to labour with me.
R. For I am thy servant and son of thine handmaid.

Reading 6: How far-spreading is the field of justice appeareth by this, that there is excepted therefrom no place, person, or time, nay, she hath to do even as regards enemies, for if one be agreed with his enemy of a certain place, or day for battle, it should be deemed unjust to fall on him beforehand, at some other place, or time. For it is a very different thing, whether one get the better of another in a hard fight, or by skill, or by accident.

R. Initium sapiéntiæ timor Dómini: * Intelléctus bonus ómnibus faciéntibus eum: laudátio ejus manet in sæculum sæculi.
V. Diléctio illíus custódia legum est: quia omnis sapiéntia timor Dómini.
R. Intelléctus bonus ómnibus faciéntibus eum: laudátio ejus manet in sæculum sæculi.
R. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.* A good understanding have all they that do His commandments. His praise endureth for ever.
V. Love is the keeping of her laws, for all wisdom is the fear of the Lord.
R. A good understanding have all they that do His commandments. His praise endureth for ever.

Reading 7: If therefore in war justice hath place, how much more is she to be observed in time of peace.Honour is the foundation of justice. The thoughts in the hearts of just men are honourable thoughts and when the just man accuseth himself, it is honour that bringeth him to that just deed. Then is his justice made manifest by his honourable avowal. 

R. Verbum iníquum et dolosum longe fac a me, Dómine: * Dívítias et paupertátem ne déderis mihi, sed tantum victui meo tríbue necessaria.
V. Duo rogávi te, ne déneges mihi ántequam moriar.
R. Dívítias et paupertátem ne déderis mihi, sed tantum victui meo tríbue necessaria.
R. Lord, remove far from me vanity and lies.* Give me neither poverty nor riches, but feed me with food convenient for me.
V. Two things have I required of thee deny me them not before I die.
R. Give me neither poverty nor riches, but feed me with food convenient for me.

Reading 8: The Lord saith by Isaiah " Behold, I lay in Zion a foundation-stone" xxviii. 16, that is to say, He giveth Christ unto the Church to be her foundation. Christ is the true honour for all men, and the Church is as it were a figure of justice, being a commonwealth wherein all have rights, and which worketh as one, and suffereth as one. Whosoever denieth himself, the same is just, and worthy of Christ. Therefore also Paul saith " Other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ ", and upon that foundation is it, that every building of justice must be raised. For the spirit of Christ is the true spirit of honour which is the foundation whereon justice resteth.

R. Magna enim sunt iudícia tua, Dómine, et inenarrabília verba tua: * Magnificásti pópulum tuum et honorásti.
V. Transtulísti illos per Mare Rubrum et transvexísti eos per aquam nimiam.
R. Magnificásti pópulum tuum et honorasti.
V: Gloria...
R. Magnificásti pópulum tuum et honorasti.
R. Great are thy judgments, O Lord, and thy words cannot be expressed.
* Thou didst make thy people mighty and honourable.
V. Thou broughtest them through the Red Sea, and leddest them through much water.
R. Thou didst make thy people mighty and honourable.
V: Glory be
R. Thou didst make thy people mighty and honourable.

Nocturn III 

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Mark - At that time Jesus, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis. And so on.

Homily by Pope St Gregory the Great - What signifieth it that when God, the Maker of all, would heal a deaf and dumb man, "He put His Fingers into his ears, and He spit, and touched his tongue." What is figured by the Fingers of the Redeemer but the gifts of the Holy Ghost? Hence it is written in another place Luke xi. 20 that after He had cast out an evil spirit, He said: "If I with the finger of God cast out devils, no doubt the kingdom of God is come upon you." Which words are thus given by another Evangelist Matth. xii. 28: "If I cast out devils by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God is come unto you." By setting these two passages together we see that the Spirit is called the Finger.

R. Domine pater et Deus vitae meae, ne derelinquas me in cogitatu maligno: extollentiam oculorum meorum ne dederis mihi, et desiderium malignum averte a me Domine; aufer a me concupiscentiam, * Et animo irreverenti et infrunito ne tradas me Domine.
V. Ne derelinquas me Domine, ne accrescant ignorantiae meae, nec multiplicentur delicta mea.
R. Et animo irreverenti et infrunito ne tradas me Domine.
R. O Lord, Father and God of my life, leave me not to evil counsels; give me not a proud look, but turn away from me an haughty mind, O Lord Turn away from me concupiscence, * And give me not over unto an impudent and froward mind, O Lord!
V. Leave me not, O Lord, lest mine ignorance increase, and my sins abound.
R. And give me not over unto an impudent and froward mind, O Lord.

Reading 10: For our Lord, then, to put His Fingers into the deaf man's ears was by the gift of the Holy Spirit to enlighten his dark mind unto obedience. That signifieth it also that "He spit and touched his tongue." We receive spittle out of the Redeemer's mouth upon our tongues when we receive wisdom to speak God's truth. Spittle is a secretion of the head which floweth into the mouth. And so, that wisdom, which is Himself, the great Head of His Church, as soon as it hath touched our tongue, doth straightway take the form of preaching.

R. Quæ sunt in corde hóminum, óculi tui vident, Dómine, et in libro tuo ómnia scribéntur: * Homo videt in facie, Deus autem in corde.
V. Omnia enim corda scrutátur, et univérsas méntium cogitatiónes intélligit.
R. Homo videt in facie, Deus autem in corde.
R. Lord, thine eyes behold all that is in the heart of man, and in thy book are they all written. * Man looketh on the outward appearance, but God looketh on the heart.
V. For He searcheth all hearts, and understandeth all the imaginations of the thoughts.
R. Man looketh on the outward appearance, but God looketh on the heart.

Reading 11: "And looking up to heaven, He sighed," not that He had any need to sigh, Who gave whatsoever He asked, but that He was fain to teach us to look up and sigh toward Him Whose throne is in heaven, confessing our need, that our ears should be opened by the gift of the Holy Spirit, and our tongue loosed by the spittle of our Saviour's Mouth, that is, by knowledge of His Divine Word, before we can use it to preach to others.

R. Præbe, fili cor mihi, et óculi tui vias meas custódiant: * Ut addátur grátia cápiti tuo.
V. Attende, fili mi, sapiéntiam meam et ad elóquium meum inclína aurem tuam.
R. Ut addátur grátia cápiti tuo.
R. My son, give me thine heart, and let thine eyes observe my ways. * For they shall be an ornament of grace unto thine head.
V. My son, attend unto my wisdom, and incline thine ear unto my sayings.
R. For they shall be an ornament of grace unto thine head.

Reading 12: "And He said unto him: Ephphatha, that is, be opened. And straightway his ears were opened, and the string of his tongue was loosed." Herein we must remark the command, "Be opened" was addressed to the deaf ears, but the tongue also was immediately loosed. Just so, when the ears of a man's heart have been opened to learn the obedience of faith, the string of his tongue also is thereupon loosed, that he may exhort others to do the good things which himself doth. It is well added "And he spake plain." He only doth well preach obedience to others who hath first learnt himself to obey.

R. Duo Seraphim clamabant alter ad alterum:
* Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth: * Plena est omnis terra gloria ejus.
V. Tres sunt qui testimonium dant in caelo, Pater, Verbum, et Spiritus Sanctus: et hi tres unum sunt.
R. Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth:
V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, * et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Plena est omnis terra gloria ejus.
R. One Seraph cried unto another * Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.


Gospel: St Mark 7:31-37:


And again going out of the coasts of Tyre, he came by Sidon to the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis. And they bring to him one deaf and dumb; and they besought him that he would lay his hand upon him. And taking him from the multitude apart, he put his fingers into his ears, and spitting, he touched his tongue: And looking up to heaven, he groaned, and said to him: Ephpheta, which is, Be thou opened.  And immediately his ears were opened, and the string of his tongue was loosed, and he spoke right. And he charged them that they should tell no man. But the more he charged them, so much the more a great deal did they publish it.  And so much the more did they wonder, saying: He hath done all things well; he hath made both the deaf to hear, and the dumb to speak.